Page:A Study of Mexico.djvu/188

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178
A STUDY OF MEXICO.

bles, or charcoal, 6 cents (as a supposed road-tax), and so on; and, on entering another town, all these exactions are repeated. A miller, in Mexico, it is said, is obliged to pay thirty-two separate taxes on his wheat, before he can get it from the field and offer it, in the form of flour, on the market, for consumption. As a matter of necessity, furthermore, every center of population—small and big, city, town, or hamlet—swarms with petty officials, who are paid to see that not an item of agricultural produce, of manufactured goods, or an operation of trade or commerce or even a social event, like a fandango, a christening, a marriage, or a funeral, escapes the payment of tribute.[1]

  1. The following is a copy of the tariff of the city of Guerrero—one hundred and fifty miles southeast of the capital—for articles exported from the city, on account of its municipal fund, as published in the year 1883:
    1. For every kind of animal killed for purpose of speculation $ .25
    2. For every head of horses, mules, or cattle taken out of the country 1.00
    3. For every head of horses, mules, or cattle taken into the interior .1212
    4. For every fat pork which is taken out of town or which is killed in town for purpose of speculating .0614
    5. For every beef-hide taken out of town .0314
    6. For every thousand head of sheep or goats taken out of the country 12.00
    7. For every thousand head of sheep or goats taken outside of the limits of the town 1.00
    8. For every horse, mule, or jackass taken out of the limits of the town .25