Page:A chambermaid's diary.djvu/239

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rial regions.



Kimberly began :

" Frederic-Ossian Pinggleton and his friend, John-Giotto Farfadetti, were finishing their daily- tasks in the studio which they occupied in common. One was the great painter, the other the great poet; the former short and stout, the latter tall and thin; both alike clad in drugget robes, their heads alike adorned with Florentine BONNETS, both alike neurasthenics, for they had, in different bodies, like souls and lily-twin spirits. John- Giotto Farfadetti sang in his verses the marvelous symbols that his friend, Frederic-Ossian Pinggle- ton, painted on his canvases, so that the glory of the poet was inseparable from that of the painter, and that their works and their immortal geniuses had come to be confounded in one and the same adoration. ' '

Kimberly stopped for a moment. The silence was religious. Something sacred hovered over the table. He continued:

" The day was nearing its end. A very soft twilight was enveloping the studio in a pallor of fluid and lunar shade. Scarcely could one still distinguish on the mauve walls the long, supple, waving, golden algas that seemed to move in obedience to the vibration of some deep and magic water. John-Giotto Farfadetti closed the sort of antiphonary on the vellum of "which, with a Per- sian reed, he wrote, or rather engra