Page:America's National Game (1911).djvu/347

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CHAPTER XXII.

FREEDMAN IMBROGLIO CONTINUED—AN ELECTION THAT DID NOT ELECT BUT WAS MADE TO SERVE AN IMPORTANT PURPOSE—A LEGAL OPINION BY THE HON. THOS. B. REED.

1901-02

THE premature publication of the article on "The Trust Scheme" created a profound sensation. My speech in the Convention did not pour oil upon the troubled waters. The entire Base Ball world was stirred to its depths. The would-be Syndicate had to do something to turn back the tide of public indignation sweeping in from all quarters. The press of the whole country had gone into a discussion of the subject. Everywhere the scheme was denounced as outrageous; and so the Trust was forced to emerge from the cover into which its members had crept when the storm broke. The first sound from that quarter was the bland announcement that the Convention was prevented from transacting its customary business by the deadlock occasioned by Mr. Spalding's efforts to have himself elected President of the League! I met this charge by inviting members of the press to meet me at my hotel, where I told them such facts as were pertinent to the situation. I said to them that I was not in any sense a candidate for the office of President of the National League; that I didn't want it, and that if elected I would resign unless Andrew Freedman got out at once!

After the publication of the interviews growing out

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