Page:America's National Game (1911).djvu/437

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CHAPTER XXIX.

THE UMPIRE AND WHAT IS DUE TO HIM AND HIS OFFICE—VERY GREAT ADVANCE MADE IN TREATMENT OF THE UMPIRE—THE NEW PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE A FORMER UMPIRE.
 

1860-1910

UP TO this point consideration has not been given to the Umpire. In this omission I have not been unmindful of the importance of that functionary to the game; nor have I forgotten how extremely difficult it has ever been to secure for him the deference due to his position from managers, players and the public. But, as the umpire has been in evidence from the very inception of the sport, and is to-day a more potent factor than ever, I have deferred treating of him and what is due to him until it might be done in a chapter devoted exclusively to that subject.

To secure the presence of intelligent, honest, unprejudiced, quick-witted, courageous umpires at all contests in scheduled games has been one of the most vexatious problems confronting those in control of our national sport. The combination of attributes required is very difficult to find in any individual. It is not easy to put one's hand upon a man who possesses any two of these several qualifications; and yet the efficient umpire must have them all.

The umpire must be intelligent. And by intelligence

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