Page:America's National Game (1911).djvu/563

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CHAPTER XXXVII.

CONCLUSION—THE PSYCHOLOGY OF BASE BALL—MR. EDWARD MARSHALL'S INTERVIEW ON THE EFFECT OF THE GAME ON THE MIND AND OF THE MIND ON THE GAME.

I HAVE thought best to conclude this book with an article written by Edward Marshall on "The Psychology of Base Ball," and which appeared in the Sunday issue of the New York Times, November 13th, 1910.

My reasons for giving space to this article are:

First—Because it deals with a side of the subject (the psychological) which had been heretofore overlooked, and

Second—Because it contained many thoughts that had existed in my mind for years, but had never before been expressed in words.

Mr. Marshall has the happy faculty of interviewing one in such a searching manner that, without apparent effort, he enters the recesses of his subject's mind and brings to light the inmost thoughts of the one interviewed.

The circumstances leading up to the interview came about in this way: Mr. Homer Davenport, the celebrated cartoonist, and a great admirer of the American national game, said to me one day that Mr. Edward Marshall, the well-known author, had expressed a desire to "interview" me on the "Psychology of Base Ball," and asked if he might bring Mr. Marshall to call at my New York hotel for that purpose. I consented, and a meeting was arranged for the next evening.

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