Page:Black's Law Dictionary (Second Edition).djvu/1206

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VAVASOUR

VAVASOUR. One who was in dignity next to a baron. Britt. 109; Bract. lib. 1, 1'. 8. One who held of a haron. Enc. Brit.

V1-EAL-MONEY. The tenants of the man- or of Bradford, in the county of Wilts, paid a yearly rent by this name to their lord, in lieu of veal paid formerly in kind. Wharton.

VECORIN. In old Lomhardic law. The oilense of stopping one on the way; foreslaiiing. Spelmnn.

VECTIGAL JUDICIARIUM. Lat.

Fines pull] to the crown to defray the at- penses of maintaining courts of justice. 3 Snlli. 33.

Vectigal, nrigine ipsa, jun Caesm-um et tegum patrimuniale eat. Dav. 12. Tribute, in its origin, is the patrinionial light of emperors and liings.

VECTIGALIA. In Roman law. Custolns-ilunus; taxes paid upon the importation or exportation of certain kinds of merchan-

dise. Cod. 4. 61. VI-ICTURA. In maritime law. Freight. VEHICLE. The word “vehicle” includes

every description of carriage oi- other artifi- L‘lfll contrivauce used, or capable of being used, as a means of transportation on land. Rev. St. U. S. § 4 (U. S. Comp. St. 1901, p. 4).

VEHMGERIC]-1'1‘. See FEHMGEEICET.

V1-DIES. L. Fr. Distresses forbidden to he replevied; the refusing to let the muuer have his tattle which were distruined. Kei- llzun.

VI-IIN. in mining law. A body of mineral or mineralizcd rocli, filling a seiml or fissure in the earth's crust, within defined boundaries in the genei.il mass of the mountain, and having a general character of continuity iu the direction of its length. See iron Silver Mln. Co. v. Cheesnian, 116 U. S. 52!) 6 Sup. Ct 481, 29 L. Ed. ‘T12; U. S. v. Iron Silver Min. Co., I28 U. S. 673. 9 Sup. Ct 1115, 32 L. Ed. 571; Stincllfleid v. Gillls, 9:5 .1]. 33, 30 Pac. S39: Synnott v. Shangh-

. _ , 2 Idaho (Hash.) 12., 7 Pac. 82; Beals \. (June. 27 Colo. 473, 62 Pac. 948, 83 Ann. St. Rep. 92, Waterloo Min. Co. v. Doe. 82 Fed. 51, 27 C. C. A. 50: Consolidated, etc., Min. Co. v. Champion Mm. Co. (G. G.) 63 Fed. 51-1.

VI-HOURS. Viewers; persons sent hy the court to take a view of any place in question, for the hettor decision of the right. It signifies, also, such as are sent to view those that essoin themselves do malo lcr-ti, (i. 9., excuse themselves on ground of illness)

1198

VEN DITIONI EXPONAB

whether they be in truth so sick as that they cannot appear, or whether they do counterfeit Cowell.

VELABRUM. In old English law. A boil-booth. Cro. Jac. 122.

VELITIS JUBEATIS QUIRITES1 Dal‘. is it your will and pleasure, Roinaiisl The form of proposing a law to the Roman peo- ple. Tayl. Civil Law. 155.

179119 non ereditur qui nbseqnitur imperia patri: val domini. He is not presumed to consent who obeys the orders of his father or his master. Dig. 50. 17, 4.

VELTRARIA. The ofllce of dog-leader, or courser. Oowcil.

V]-1'l.'.'l‘R.ARIUS. hounds. Blount.

One who leads grey-

VENAL. Something that is bought; ca- pable of being bought; offered for sale; iner- cenary. Used in an evil sense, such pur- chase or sale being regarded as corrupt and illegal.

VI-INARIA. Beasts caught in the woods hy hunting.

VENATIO.}} Hunting. Cowell.

V1-IND. To sell; to transfer the ownership of an article to another for a price in money. The term is not conunonly applied to the sale of real estate, although its derivatives “vendor” and "vendee" are.

VENZDEE. A purchaser or buyer: one to whom anything is sold. Generally used of the trausleree of real property, one who ac- quires chattels by sale being called a ‘buy- er."

Vendens eandem rem duubua falsarina est. He is fraudulent who sells the same thing tuice. Jenk. Cent. 107.

VENDIBLE. Fit or suitable to be sold: capable of transfer by sule; iuerchantahle.

VENDITE. In old European law. A tax upoll things sold in markets and public fairs. Spelnlan.

VENDITIO.}} Lat. In the civil law. In I strict sense, sale; the act of selling; the contract of sale, otherwise called "emptio ocu- Iiitio." Inst. 3, 24. Calvin.

In a large sense, Any mode or species of alienation; any c5ntract by which the property or ownership of a thing may be transferred. Id.

VENZDITION. Sale: the act of selling,

VENDITIONI EXPDNAS. Lat. You

expose to sale. This is the name of a writ