Page:Black's Law Dictionary (Second Edition).djvu/541

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G

G. In the Law French orthography, this letter is often substituted for the English W, particularly as an initial. Thus, "gage" for "wage," “garranty" for "warranty," “gast" tor "wastef"

GABEL. An excise; a tax on movables: a rent, custom, or service. Co. Litt. 213. —La.n-i gabel. See Lam).

GAB]-:I..I..A. The Law Latin form of "aubel.” (q. 12.)

G A B L A T O R E S. yabcl, rent, or tribute.

Persons who paid Domesday; Cowell.

GABLUM. A rent; a tax. Domesday: Du Cange. The gable-end of a house. Cow-

GABULUS DENARIORUM. in money. Seld. Tit. Hon. 321.

Rent paid

GAFFOLDGILD. tom or tribute. Scott

The payment of cus-

GAFFOLDLANJJ. Property subject to the gaflfoidgild, or liable to be taxed. Scott.

GAFOI... The same word as "gabel" or "gavel." Rent; tax; interest of money.

GAGE, 1:. In old English law. To pawn or pledge; to give as security for a payment or performance; to wage or wager.

GAGE, Vb. In old English law. A pawn or pledge: something deposited as 5% curity for the performance of some act or the payment of money, and to be forfeited on failure or non-performance Glanv. lib. 10, c. 6: Britt. C. 27.

A mortgage is a dead-gage or pledge: to_r, whatsoever profit it yicids, it redccms not It- svif, unless the whole amount secured is paid at the appointed time. Cowell.

In French law. The contract of pledge

or pawn: also the article pawaed. —Gage, estates in. Those held in uadia. or pledge. They are of I:wo kinds: (1) Vitmm «Indium, or living pledge or vifgage: (3 mortumn mzdimru, or dead piedge, better known as "mortgage."

GAGER DE DELIVERANGE. In old English law. W"hen he who has distrained, being sued, has not delivered the cattle distrained, then he shall not only avow the distress, but gager deliverance, L e.. put in surety or pledge that he will deliver them. Fitzh. Nat Brev.

GAGEE DEL LEY. (11. 12.)

Wager of law,

GAIN. Profits: winnings; increment of value. Gray v. Darlington, 15 Wall. 65, 21

533

GAMBLE

L. Ed. 45; Thorn v. De Breteuil, 86 App. Div. 405, 83 N. r. Supp. 849.

GAINAGE. The gain or profit of ti.lled or planted land, raised by cultivating it ; and the draught, plow, and furniture for carrying on the work of tiilage by the buser kind of sokemen, or cillcins. Bract. l. i. c. 9.

GAIN]-JRY. Tiilage, or the profit arising from it, or from the beasts employ ed therein.

GAINOR. In old English law. A sol;eman; one who occupied or cultivated arable land. Old Nat. Brev. tol. 12.

GAJ UM.

GALE. or annuity.

A gale is the right to open and work a mine within the Hundred of St. Bria\'el's, or a stone quarry within the open lands of the Forest of Dean. The right is a license or interest in the nature of real estate, conditional oa the due payment of rent and ob- servance of the obiigations imposed on the‘ galee. It follows the ordinary rules as to the devolution and conveyance of real estate. The galee pays the crown a rent known as a “galeage rent," “royalty," or some similar name, proportionate to the quantity of minerals got from the mine or quarry. Sweet.

GALEA. sel: a galley.

GALENES. or compensation for slaughter.

GALLI-I-IALFPENCE. A kind of coin which, with suskins and doitkins, was for- hidden by St. 3 Hen. V. C. 1.

GALLIVOLATIUM. cock-glade

A thick wood. Spelman. The payment of a rent, tax, duty,

In old records. A piratical ves-

In old Scotch law. Bel].

Amends

A cock-shoot, or

GALLON. A ilquld measure. Containing 23] cubic inches, or four q il‘i . The imperial gallon contains about 27 , and the ale gallon 292, cubic inches. Hollemler v. Ma gone (0. C.) 38 Fed. 914; Nichols v. Beard (0. o.) 15 Fed. 431.

GALLOWS. A. scaffold: a beam laid over either one or two posts, from which maiefactors are hanged.


GAMACTA. In old European law. A

stroke or blow. Spolman.

GAMALIS. A child born in lawful wed- lock; also one born to betrothed but unmarried parents. Spelman.

GAMBLE. To game or play at a game for money. Buckley v. 0'Niel, 113 Mass. 193, 18 Am. Rep. 466. The word "gamble" is per- haps the most apt and suhstantiai to convey

H