Page:Black's Law Dictionary (Second Edition).djvu/622

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INCREASE

INCREASE. (1) The produce of hind; (Y) the olfspring of nniinais.

—Increa.se, afiidavit of. Aflidavit of pay- nient of increase.-ii costs, produced on taxation.

—Incx'ease, costs of. In English law. It was form ' 9. practice with the jur to award to the SLIL fui party in an action t e nonnniii

sum of 40s only for his costs; and the court assessed by their oixn ollzicer the at-tusi amount of the sutoessfni poi'1y‘s costs; and the amount so il.~‘<‘sS§'(1. over and above the nonnniii sum awa ded by the jury, was thence called "costs of incre.ise." Lush, Coin. Liiw Pr. 775. The practice has now wholly ceased. II)11):1L Si L-.\w.

INCREMENTUM. Lat. Increase or lin- proi einent, opposed to decrcmeiituiii or iihate inent.

INCRIMINATE. To charge with crime;

to expose to an accusation or charge of crime; tu iniuire oneseif or nnother in :1 ciiininiii prosecution or the danger thereof; iis, in the rule that a witness is not bound to give testimony \\h.icl:i would tend to incriminate hini. —I1.lcl'hn.)nat:'|ng circumstance. A fact or circiiinstnnte, tuliateriil to [he f.ic-t of the comiuission of a cl_init-, which tends to show either ihnt such Ii crime has been coniizuittod or that some particular person conimitteil it. Daiis v. State, 51 1‘n:b. 301. 70 N. W. 9&1.

INCROACHMENT. A.n unl-.iW1ul gaii.ning upon the right or possession of ainother. See I:."NLI1oAC1i.\iEN'r.

INCULPATE. To lnipute hiame or guilt; to accuse; to involve in guilt or crime.

INCULPATORY. In the laws of eiiilence. Goiw or tending to estiihiish guilt; intended to estahilsh guilt; criininutive. Buri-‘ill, Circ. Ev. 251. 252.

INCUMBENT. A person who is in present possession of an ollice; one who is le- gully uuthorized to clis<:b.irge the duties of .in office. State v. McColiisti.-r, 11 Ohlo, 50; ‘tiite v. Biakemore, 101 M0. 340. 15 S. W. ‘JUU.

In ecclesiastical law, the term signifies a iiergyinain who 1S i.u possession of :1 bone- lice.

TNCUMBER. To incumber liind is to iniike it suliject to a charge or liiiliillty: e. 11., by mortg,-aging it. Inciiinhrances include not only mortgages and other voiuntury ihirges, but also liens, lites pondciiies, reg- istered judgnieiils, and Writs of execution,

eir- Sixeet. See Newhnll v. Insurance 00., 52 Me. 181. INCIJMBRANCE. Any right to, or in-

terest in, land which may subsist in third persons, to the (limiiiution of the value of the estxite of the t(:i.i.int, but Consistently with the ixissing of the fee. Fitch v. Sex lLIO‘l.lX‘. 9 Meta

614

IN DEBITATUB

(1\I:1ss.) 461; Uuyck v. Andrews, 113 N. Y. 51, 20 N. E. 581, 3 L R. A. 9, 10 Ani. St. Rep. 432; Ailing v. Burlock, 16 Conn. .310: Deniers v. lioehler, 62 N. J. imvi. " 3, -11 Atl. 720, 72 Am. St. Rep. 61).; Lntferty v. Miiligan, 165 Psi. 534, 30 All. 1031); Stimb:1u<=,h v. Smith, 23 Ohio St. 591.

A claim, lien, chaige, or ilabitity atuiCli- ed to and binding re.i1 property; as, is. mort- gage, judgment-lien, nttachnient, right of (lower, right of Way or other easement, nu- 1»:ild water rent, IEIISB. unpiiid taxes or sue siiient. Mennnert v. Mclxeen, 1.12 -1 A111. 342; Gordon v. l\IcCnlloh, U6 1\Id. 2-1 . 7 Atl. -mi; Iiiiirison v. imilroad Co.. 91 Iowa. 114, 58 N. W. 1081; Kelsey v. Ilenicr. -13 Conn. 129, 21 Ana. Rep. hii‘<; ltunnels v. \\‘t-liber, 59 Me. 490; C1'ochei v. Cutting, 173 l\I-‘iss. GS, 53 N. 158; in re Geri!’ (D. C.) 112 Fed. Sn‘; Rt‘/Wn]:‘l1i v. 1-‘ inklin Ins. Co.. -310 Md. (:31: Clll'l'li v. L‘ ber, .34 I\fll]. 403. SS Pat. 493, Pindnion v. In- l~'lll'1lllK‘e L‘o., 51 “is. 2113, S N. W. “ii. .37 Am. Rep. 330; Funk v. \one1d;i_ 11 §L‘l'g. J‘: [L (I'.\.) 112, 14 Am. Dec (511-, Eiriiii.-xvii v. Tourtelutt (C. C.) 39 Fed. 740. Muddiitlis V. Stevens. S9 Me. 336. 313 Atl. 398. covenant against.

—1neunxin-anees, See

Covsnsm

INCUBIBRANCER. The holder of an iiicuinbrnuce, u. 11., 21 mortgage, on the estate of another. De \ oe v. Bundle, 33 Wash. mil, 74 Pac. S36; Shaeffer v. Weed. 8 111. 514; Newhnli v. Insurance Co., 52 Me. 181.

INCUR. Men contiact debts; they incur liabilities. in the one case, they act ulIirun~ tively; In the other, the liahihty ls incuired or cast upon them by not or ope] ntion of l-iw. "Iiicur" niezins soniething -beyond contracts, —soniethnig not embraced in the ixurd “dehts.” Crzuiilall v. B "yon, 5 Alib. Pnic. i-.\ Y.) 169; Beekiuziu v. Van Dolseu, 70 lluii 238, 24 N. Y. Supp. 41-1; Ashe v. ion I‘, 65 Tex. 123, 3 S. W. 454.

INCURR.AIVIEN'l"UM. L. L.it. The Hability to a fine, penalty, or ul1lCl‘LEn)El.l|‘. Cowell.

INDE. of ; thereupon ;

Lat. Thence; theiiceforth; thera- for that cause.

Inde datin leges ne fortiot omnin pos-

'Iet. Liiws are uiode to prevent the stiongt-r

fioni haung the power to do ereryuiing. Dav. Ir. K. B. 36.

INDEBITATUS. Lot Indehted. Nim- quani iiidchitiiiiis. never indebted. The tltie of the plea substituted in England for nil debut.

—IndeI2il:atns assumpsit. Lnt. Being In- (lchtod. he promised or undertook. This is the nsine of that form of the uction of l188II.lllp.?1l

in which the declaration alieges E debt or ub-