Page:Black's Law Dictionary (Second Edition).djvu/701

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LESION E FIDEL

1., when a vendor had not received half the value of property sold, or the purchaser had paid more than double value. Colo. Rom. Chi] Lav», 5 2094.

LKISIONE FIDEL, SUITS PRO. Suits in the ecclesiastical courts for spiritual offenses against conscience, for non-payment of debts, or breaches of civil contracts. This attempt to turn the ecclesiastical courts into courts of equity was checked by the constitarlons of Clarendon, A. D. 1164. 3 Bl. Comm. 52.

LESIWERP. A thing surrendered into the hands or power of another; a thing giv-

en or delivered. Speiinan. LET. In old English law. One of a class between servlie and free Palgrave, 1. LIETARE JERUSALEM. Easter 0!‘-

ferings, so called from these words in the hymn of the day. They are also denominated "qmzdra.gesinialii7..” “Fharton.

LHITI-LE, or LATHE. A division 01' district peculiar to the county of Kent. Spel- man

LAFORDSWIC. In Saxon law. A be-

traying of one’s lord or master.

LAGA. L. Lnt., from the Saxon “la,o" Law: :1 law.

LAG-AN. See LIGAN.

LAG}: DAY. In old English law. A law day; a time of open court; the day of the county court; a Jmidicai day.

LAGE-MAN. A lawful man; a good and lawful man. Ajuror. Cowell.

LAG-ENA. A measure of ale. to consist of six sextaries.

L Lat. In old English law. Fietzi, lib. 2, c. 11. Said (‘o\vel.L

LAG-U. In old English law. Law: also used to express the territory or district in which a particular law was in force, as Dena lagu, .i10r(‘1ia lugu, etc.

LAHLSLIT. A breach of law. Cowell. A znuict for an ofleuse. viz... twelve "ores."

LAHMAN, or LAGEMANNUS. An old word for a lawyer. Domesday, I. 189.

LAIA. A roadway in a wood. Mon. Angl. L 1. D. -183.

LAIGUS. Lat. A layman. One who is not in holy orders, or not engaged in the ministry of religion.

LAIRWITE, or LAIRESITE. A fine for adultery or fornication, ant-iently paid to the lords of some manors. 4 Inst. 206.

693

LANCASTER LAIS GENTS. L. Fr. Lay people: a Jury. LAITY. In English law. Those persons

who do not make a part of the clergy. They are diiided into three states: (1) (Iivil, icnluding all the nation, except the clergy, the army, und navy, and subdivided into the no- bility and the comrnowaltu; (2) military; (3) 7INlI"Lti17iG, consisting of the navy. Wharton.

LAKE. A large body of water, contained in a depression of the earths surface, and supplied from the drainage of a moi'e or loss extended alea. Webster. See Jones v. Lee, 77 Mich. 35. 43 N. W. 855; Ne—pee-nauh Club v. Wilson, 96 Wis. 290. 71 N. W. (961.

The fact that there is a current i'rom a bigher to a lower level does not make that a river which would otherwise be a lake: and the fact that a river swells out into broad, pond-like sheets, with a current, does not LLi:i.l(e that a lake which wonld otherwise be a river. State v. Gilnianton, 14 N. H. -177.

LAMANEUR. Fr. In French marine law. A pilot. Ord. I\L'il‘. 11v. 4, tit. 3.

LAMB. age of one year.

A sheep, ram, or ewe under the 4 Car. & P. 216.

I.AMBARD’S ARCKAIONOMIA. A work pilnted in 1568, containing the Anglo- Saxon laws, those of William the Conqueror, and of Henry I.

LAMBARD'S EIRENARCHA. A work upon the office of a justice of the peace, which. having gone through two editions, one in 1579, the other in 1581, was reprinted in English in 1%.

LAMBETH DEGREE. In English law. A degree conferred by the Archbishop of Canterbury, in prejudice of the universities. 3 Steph. Comm. 65; 1 Bl. Comm. 381.

LAME DUCK. A cant term on the stool: excliauge for a person unable to meet his engagements.

LAMMAS DAY. The 1st of August It is one of the Scotch quarter riars and is what is called a “conventional term.

LAMMAS LANDS. Lands over which there is a right of pastnrnsre by persons other than the owner from about Larnrnas, or reaping tirne, nntli sowing time. ivhnrton.

LANA. Lat. in the civil law. See Dig. 32. 60, 70, 88.

Wool.

LANCASTER. A county of England. erccted into a countv Iitliatine in the reign

of Edward III., but now vested in the crown.