Page:Confederate Military History - 1899 - Volume 11.djvu/41

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CHAPTER IV.

CONVENTION RE-ASSEMBLES—RETURNS OF ELECTION COUNTED—INDEPENDENCE DECLARED—GOVERNOR HOUSTON POSTS THE VOTE MARCH 4TH—PROVISIONAL CONSTITUTION RATIFIED—COMMITTEE SENT TO THE GOVERNOR—HIS ANSWER—A RESOLUTION CONTINUING THE STATE GOVERNMENT-ALL OFFICERS TO TAKE OFFICIAL OATH-GOVERNOR AND SECRETARY REFUSE TO TAKE IT—ED CLARK DECLARED GOVERNOR—GOVERNOR HOUSTON RETIRES—HE PUBLISHES HIS PROTEST—EFFECT OF THE VOTE ON SECESSION—GENERAL HOUSTON DISCLAIMS INTENTION TO RESIST COLONEL WAITE-CONVENTION ADJOURNS—LEADING MEN THAT WENT TO THE ARMY.

WHEN the convention reconvened on the 26. of March, 1861, it was known that the provisional government of the Southern Confederacy had been instituted by the election of Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi, President, and Alexander Stephens, of Georgia, Vice-President, which generally met the approbation of the members of the Texas State convention. John H. Reagan, of Texas, had been appointed postmaster-general. The returns of the election for and against secession coming in were being counted, both in the convention and in the office of the secretary of state, which being completed on the morning of the 4th of March, exhibited the vote of the State to be 60,826, of which 46,129 was for secession and 14,697 against secession, a majority in favor of it of 31,432 votes.

The president of the convention, having about fifteen minutes before 11 o’clock a. m. on the 4th of March, 1861, announced the vote as returned and counted, "declared, on behalf of the convention and the people, the{{c|27]]