Page:Confederate Military History - 1899 - Volume 7.djvu/533

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CHAPTER V.

 

SIEGE OF CORINTH—ENGAGEMENTS AT FARMINGTON AND SERRATT'S HOUSE—EVACUATION OF CORINTH—AFFAIR AT BOONEVILLE—ORGANIZATION AT TUPELO—PATRIOTISM OF THE PEOPLE—BRAGG MOVES TO CHATTANOOGA.

BEAUREGARD now collected and reorganized the army of the Mississippi at Corinth, which became the great rallying point in the central South. Van Dorn came across the Mississippi with his army of the West. Kirby Smith sent all he could spare from East Tennessee, and Pemberton a considerable force from the Atlantic coast. The governor of Mississippi was notified by President Davis on April 10th, "Beauregard must have reinforcements to meet the vast accumulation of the enemy before him. The necessity is imminent; the case of vital importance. Send forward to Corinth all the armed men that you can furnish."

According to the official returns, the aggregate force enrolled previous to Shiloh was 59,774, and the effective total, 38,773. After the return from Shiloh the loss of 10,699 was rapidly repaired, raising the aggregate to 64,500, effective total 32,212. About a month later the aggregate was 112,092, but the effective total was only 52,706, largely on account of the sickness which was terribly prevalent while this great army was held inactive.

The assignment of Mississippi commands in this army was as follows: In Polk's First corps, Maxey's brigade, Twenty-fourth infantry, Stanford's and Smith's batteries. In Bragg's Second corps, Chalmers' brigade, Fifth, Seventh, Ninth, Tenth and Thirty-sixth (Blythe's) infantry. In Hardee's Third corps, Wood's brigade,

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