Page:Confederate Military History - 1899 - Volume 7.djvu/591

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CHAPTER VIII.

 

SERVICE OF MISSISSIPPIANS WITHOUT THE STATE IN 1862—MUNFORDVILLE—PERRYVILLE—MURFREESBORO—YORKTOWN—SEVEN PINES—SHENANDOAH VALLEY—SEVEN DAYS' BATTLES—SECOND MANASSAS—HARPER'S FERRY—SHARPSBURG—FREDERICKSBURG.

THE course of events in this State having been followed to the close of 1862, a brief account should be given of the part which was being taken by Mississippi soldiers in the other States of the Confederacy.

In the army which Bragg marched toward Louisville were a number of famous Mississippi commands, which gained distinction in Kentucky and Tennessee while their fellow citizens were fighting at Iuka, Corinth and Vicksburg. The distinctive Mississippi brigade of Bragg's army was that commanded by General Chalmers, including the Fifth regiment, Lieut.-Col. W. L. Sykes; Seventh regiment, Col. W. H. Bishop; Ninth regiment, Capt. T. H. Lynam; Tenth regiment, Col. Robert A. Smith; Twenty-ninth regiment, Col. E. C. Walthall; Blythe's regiment, Lieut.-Col. James Moore; Ninth battalion of sharpshooters, Maj. W. C. Richards. This brigade was in Withers' division, Polk's corps. In J. K. Jackson's brigade of the same corps was the Eighth regiment, Lieut.-Col. A. McNeill, also the Twenty-seventh regiment, Col. T. M. Jones, but the latter was transferred to Patton Anderson's division of Hardee's corps, and given command of a brigade including his own and the Thirtieth and Thirty-seventh regiments. With Anderson's division, in addition to Jones' brigade, were

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