Page:Confederate Military History - 1899 - Volume 7.djvu/734

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239
CONFEDERATE MILITARY HISTORY.

was engaged in a spirited and successful battle at Coffeeville. General Tilghman, who commanded on this occasion, says in his report: "I take special pleasure in mentioning the names of Brig.-Gen. W. E. Baldwin, of my own division, and Col. A. P.Thompson, commanding a brigade in General Rust's division. These officers, in command on my right and left, displayed the greatest good judgment and gallantry." General Baldwin had received his brigadier-general' s commission on the 19th of September, 1862. His command consisted of the Twentieth and Twenty-sixth Mississippi and the Twenty-sixth Tennessee regiments of infantry. He led this brigade at Port Gibson, Baker's Creek (Champion's Hill), the Big Black, and through the siege of Vicksburg. Here he was a second time made prisoner of war and paroled. After his exchange he was assigned to the command of a brigade in the district of Mobile. His further participation in the war was, however, soon cut short by his death, which occurred on the 19th day of February, 1864. In his death the Confederacy lost a gallant and efficient soldier and Mississippi an illustrious citizen.

Brigadier-General William Barksdale, famous in the annals of Mississippi both as a statesman and a soldier, was born in Rutherford county, Tenn., August 21, 1861, and before he attained his majority was admitted to the bar. He settled in Mississippi and was at one time editor of the Columbus Democrat. In the Mexican war he served as a non-commissioned officer in the Second Mississippi regiment, of which Reuben Davis was colonel. After that war he was prominent in the politics of Mississippi. He was an ardent State rights Democrat, and as such was elected to represent his district in Congress in 1853. When the war between the States began he hastened to espouse in the field the cause which he had zealously supported in peace, and entered the Confederate service as colonel of the Thirteenth regiment of Missis-