Page:Democracy in America (Reeve, v. 1).djvu/49

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DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA.





CHAPTER I.

EXTERIOR FORM OF NORTH AMERICA.

North America divided into two vast regions, one inclining y towards the Pole, the other towards the Equator.—Valley of the Mississippi.—Traces of the Revolutions of the Globe.—Shore of the Atlantic Ocean, where the English Colonies were founded.—Difference in the appearance of North and of South America at the time of their discovery.—Forests of North America.—Prairies.—Wandering Tribes of Natives.—Their outward appearance, manners, and language.—Traces of an unknown people.

NORTH AMERICA presents in its external form certain general features which it is easy to discriminate at the first glance.

A sort of methodical order seems to have regulated the separation of land and water, mountains and valleys. A simple hut grand arrangement is discoverable amidst the confusion of objects, and the prodigious variety of scenes.

This Continent is divided, almost equally, into two vast regions[1], one of which is bounded, on

  1. See the Map at the end of the Volume.
VOL. I.
B