Page:Eliot - Middlemarch, vol. II, 1872.djvu/225

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CHAPTER XXXVI.

"'Tis strange to see the humors of these men,
These great aspiring spirits, that should be wise:

For being the nature of great spirits to love

To be where they may be most eminent;
They, rating of themselves so farre above
Us in conceit, with whom they do frequent,
Imagine how we wonder and esteeme
All that they do or say; which makes them strive
To make our admiration more extreme,
Which they suppose they cannot, 'less they give
Notice of their extreme and highest thoughts.

Daniel: Tragedy of Philotas


Mr Vincy went home from the reading of the will with his point of view considerably changed in relation to many subjects. He was an open-minded man, but given to indirect modes of expressing himself: when he was disappointed in a market for his silk braids, he swore at the groom; when his brother-in-law Bulstrode had vexed him, he made cutting remarks on Methodism; and it was now apparent that he regarded Fred's idleness with a sudden increase of severity, by his throw-