Page:Eliot - Middlemarch, vol. II, 1872.djvu/36

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26

 

CHAPTER XXIV.

"The offender's sorrow brings but small relief
To him who wears the strong offence's cross."

Shakespeare: Sonnets.


I am sorry to say that only the third day after the propitious events at Houndsley Fred Vincy had fallen into worse spirits than he had known in his life before. Not that he had been disappointed as to the possible market for his horse, but that before the bargain could be concluded with Lord Medlicote's man, this Diamond, in which hope to the amount of eighty pounds had been invested, had without the slightest warning exhibited in the stable a most vicious energy in kicking, had just missed killing the groom, and had ended in laming himself severely by catching his leg in a rope that overhung the stable-board. There was no more redress for this than for the discovery of bad temper after marriage-which of course old companions were aware of before the ceremony. For