Page:Eliot - Middlemarch, vol. IV, 1872.djvu/322

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.

312

 

CHAPTER LXXXIII.

"And now good-morrow to our waking souls
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room, an everywhere."

Dr Donne.


On the second morning after Dorothea's visit to Rosamond, she had had two nights of sound sleep, and had not only lost all traces of fatigue, but felt as if she had a great deal of superfluous strength—that is to say, more strength than she could manage to concentrate on any occupation. The day before, she had taken long walks outside the grounds, and had paid two visits to the Parsonage; but she never in her life told any one the reason why she spent her time in that fruitless manner, and this morning she was rather angry with herself for her childish restlessness. To-day was to be spent quite differently. What was there to be done in the village? O dear! nothing. Everybody was well and had flannel; nobody's pig had