Page:Ethnological studies (Roth).djvu/19

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LIST OF ILLUSTEATIONS.

Plate I. Sketch Map of Noeth-West-Centeal Queensland. Plate II. SiGN-LANGirAGE (Chapteb IV.) — Fig. 1, Bingo, Dog; 2-3, Horse; 4-5, Cattle; 6-7, Eat; 8-10, "Porcupine"; H-16, Bandicoot ; 17-20, Opossum, &c. ; 21-23, Paddymelon, &c. ; 24, Kangaroo. Plate III. Sign-Language (continued) — • Fig. 25, Kangaroo ; 26-29, Bird ; 30, Small Hawk ; 31-32, Large Eagle-hawk ; 33-34, Pigeon ; 35-37, Emu ; 38-40, Turkey-bustard ; 41-43, Pelican ; 44-45, Cockatoo, &c. ; 46, Duck. Plate IV. Sign-Languaqb (continued) — Fig. 47, Black Crow ; 48, Diver-bird, &c. ; 49-50, Native Companion ; 51-52, Large Spoonbill ; 53-55, Lizard, Iguana ; 56, Iguana ; 57-59, Snake ; 60, Water-snake ; 61, Carpet- snake; 62, Black-headed Snake ; 63, Frog ; 64-69, Fish, &c. Plate V. Sign-Language (continued) — Fig. 70-72, Fresh-water Mussel ; 73-74, Any small Fly ; 75, Sand-fly ; 76-77, Mosquito ; 78, Sand-fly ; 79, Any small Fly ; 80-82, Honey, Honey-bee, &a. ; 83-84, Caterpillar ; 85, Hair- louse ; 86, Cray-fish; 87, Wild Orange ; 88-89, Yams; 90, "Witooka"; 91, "Mungaroo"; 92, Native Flax, &c. ; 93-95, Pig-weed ; 96, Nardoo. Plate VI. Sign-Language (continued) — Fig. 97-100, Seed-food, &c. ; 101, Wild Rice ; 102-104, Pituri ; 105, Water, &o. ; 106, Eiver, &o. ; 107, Waterfall, &o. ; 108-109, Mountain ; 110, Adult Man, &c. ; 111, Adult Woman ; 112-113, Mother ; 114, Husband, Wife ; 115-119, Woman, &o. ; 120, Brother, Sister ; 121, Child, Infant. Plate VH. Sign-Language (continued) — Fig. 122-124, Child, &o. ; 125-127, Doctor, &c. ; 128-129, Waist-belt ; 130, Necklace ; 131, Chest Ornament ; 132-133, Dilly-bag ; 134-136, Grass-necklace ; 137-139, Stone Knife ; 140-141, Boomerang ; 142-144, Spear ; 145, Fighting-pole. Plate VIII. Sign-Language (continued) — • Fig. 146-147, Fighting-pole, &c. ; 148-149, Stone-tomahawk ; 150-151, Shield ; 152-157, Koolamon,&o. ; 158-159, Net, &c. ; 160-162, Hut, &c. ; 163-166, Large Number; 167, Hither!; 168, Thither! Plate IX. Sign Language (continued) — Fig. 169-170, Thither! ; 171-172, Place, Direction ; 173, Sunrise, &c. ; 174, Sunset, &c. ; 175, Interrogation ; 176, Request, Demand ; 177-178, Silence! ; 179, Out of the Road! ; 180, Run!; 181-182, Stay! &c. ; 183, To Cover with Earth, &c. ; 184-187, Corrobboree; 188-189, Fire, &o. Plate X. Sign-Language (continued) — Fig. 190-192, Fire, &c. ; 193, Sleep; 194-195, Swimming ; 196-197, To Grasp, &c. ; 198, To Eat; 199-200, An^er, &o. ; 201-204, Sickness, &c. ; 205-206, Forgetfulness ; 207, Yes! ; 208, No!; 209-210, Goodness, &c. ; 211, Evil, &c. ; 212, Ghost ; 213, Water-sprite. Plate XI. The Seaech foe Food. (Chaptee V.) — Fig. 214, Woman, resting her weight on the Tripod, is treading upon the crushed Star- grass in the shallow circular hole ; 215, The Rotary Motion exerted by one foot upon the other ; 216, The Seed-food treated upon the .Grindstones ; 217-218, Stages in the Preparation of the " Katoora" grass ; 219, Pig-weed Seed obtained by rubbing the plant between the flattened palms ; 220, 222, Fishing in Shallow Water with small-sized flat nets ; 221, Fishing with a Long Net in deep water; 223, Fishing with single small oval net ; 224, Stone Weir for trapping fish ; 225, Dam com- posed of women huddled close together, holding bunches of boughs, leaves, &c. , m front of them ; 226, Diagram, showing two Emu-nets, in situ ; 227, Individual in the act of Weaving an Emu-net ; 228, Long Alley-way, built of boughs, &c., into and along which the emus are driven and caught by net; 229, Circular Fence, with "wings" and pit-falls for trapping emus ; 230, Drop-net for catching .flock pigeons, &c.; 231, Alley- way and Net for trapping small birds in general ; 232, Three Emu- nets placed in form of an enclosure, into which the kangaroos are driven. Plate XII. Domestic Implements and Utensils. Fiee-sticks and Yam-sticks, Huts and Shbltees. (Chaptee VI.) — Fig. 233, Koolamon ; 234, Koolamon, carried at side of the body ; 235, Chisel ; 236, Operator using a chisel ; 237, Marsupial-skin Water-bag ; 238, Method of carrying Water-bag ; 239a, b, 0, Dilly-bags ; 240, Individual making Flax-twine ; 241, Diagram of the different meshes met with in a dilly-bag ; 242, Upper Movable Grindstone ; 243, Nardoo-stone ; 244, Making Fire by twirling the fire-stick between the flattened palms ; 245, Making Fire by a sawing move- ment of one stick upon the other ; 245a, Yam-stick ; 246a, b. Different ways of fixing together the two curved saplings which form the primary supports of a hut scaffolding ; 247a, b. Bird's- eye and side view of the primary and secondary supports of same ; 248, Framework of Temporary Bough-shed, for protection from rain, at hut entrance ; 249, Another form of Bough-shed ; 250, Hut covered with sheets of bark, which are being kept in position by heavy timbers ; 251, Hut built somewhat after the style depicted in 249.