Page:Folk-lore - A Quarterly Review. Volume 16, 1905.djvu/80

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
This page needs to be proofread.


58 Collectanea.

The maidens of Padstow might if they would,

For summer is acome unto day, They have made a garland with the white rose and the red,

In the merry morning of May.

Now fare you well, and we bid you all good cheer,

For summer is acome unto day, We call once more unto your house before another year,

In the merry morning of May.

The Day Song.

Awake, St. George, our English Knight O, For summer is acome O and winter is ago.

And every day God give us his grace, By day and by night O.

Where is St. George, where is he O

He is out in his long boat all on the salt sea O, And in every land O, the land that ere we go.

And for to fetch the summer home, the

summer and the May O, For summer is acome O, and winter is ago.

Where are the French dogs that make such boast O,

They shall eat the grey goose feather. And we will eat the roast O,

And in every land O, the land that ere we go.

Thou might'st have shown thy knavish face.

Thou might'st have tarried at home O, But thou shalt be an old cuckold. And thou shalt wear the horns [O].

With Hal-an-tow, and jolly rumble O,

For summer is acome O, and winter is ago, And in every land O, the land that ere we go.

Up flies the kite and down falls the Lark O,

Aunt Ursula Birdhood she had an old ewe, And she died in her own Park O.

And for to fetch the summer home, etc.

( The Choruses to he repealed alternately.)

Now fare you well, and we bid you all good cheer,

For summer is acome unto day. We call no more unto your house before another year.

In the merry morning of May.