Page:Folk-lore - A Quarterly Review. Volume 21, 1910.djvu/116

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Scraps of Scottish Folklore, I.

Aberdeenshire. On two occasions of marriage on Lower Deeside, one being that of the uncle of my informant, forty -five years ago, the bridegroom was followed from the place in which the wedding took place by a procession of couples, the first pair of which were two young men, who walked close behind the newly married man holding behind him by the upper corners a sheet or other white cloth at about the height of his shoulders. They followed thus for a distance, keeping the cloth in the same position as if they were guarding him from a draught. Was this to prevent his shadow from being trodden upon?

About 6o years ago, an old man living on Lower Deeside had an attack of a feverish affection locally known as " the sleeping fever," and his wife took a number of stones and heated them red hot in the ashes of a low peat fire. She then carried them in a pot still surrounded by glowing embers to the ford, and dropped them in one by one. The ford carried the road to the