Page:God Manifest.djvu/81

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71
SEEN IN MAN'S GOODNESS.

what we may conceive of the angelic character, than any perhaps whom biography describes. His spirit of utter self-sacrifice, of entire submission to the will of his Heavenly Father, of perfect trust in His Divine care and Paternal providence and love,—an almost angelic superiority to all earthly wishes, and complete consecration of himself to his God, joined at the same time with a course of active duty and love to his fellow-men,—these traits of character, as exhibited throughout his admirable writings and in his whole life and conduct, place him among the most elevated spirits that have adorned and blessed humanity and the world.

These two high-souled men, France claims for her own, as England claims Howard. America, too, has one, who in his own line and kind of goodness, stands perhaps first and highest,—the patriot Washington. Noble and disinterested, faithful and true, was that great man,—an example to the world; one, who by his lofty virtue, as well as by the native dignity and firmness oi his character, excited the awe, mingled with admiration, of all who approached him. Whence came that lofty virtue and disinterested patriotism, and whence, too, the wisdom and power, by which it accomplished its high ends? Look into Washington's private history, and we discern the secret. Behold him, in the darkest hour of his country's struggle, and when fear and distress filled every heart,—behold him, near the winter camp where the snow was marked by the bleeding feet of his poor soldiers,—kneeling, in a retired spot, beneath a tree, and offering up a fervent prayer to God above, for his country's deliverance. In this act of devotion he was overheard by a passer-by: and the listener, struck and awed by what he had wit-