Page:Guatimala or the United Provinces of Central America in 1827-8.pdf/18

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CHAPTER II.

Belize,—Population,—Government,—Commerce,—Soil,—Insects,—Climate,—Diseases,—Emigration.


The view of the town from the roadstead is interesting, and some parts of it highly picturesque. Its principal street stretches along the shore for a considerable distance, and consists of tolerably good houses built of wood, the lower stories occupied as stores and the upper as dwellings: cocoa nut trees interspersed among the buildings relieve the prospect, and give to the whole the character of West Indian scenery. The bay derives its chief interest from the number of pleasure boats doreys and pit pans, passing and repassing on its still waters. The latter, a species of long narrow canoe propelled by paddles, are novel to an European eye.

This settlement contains between five and 6000 souls,[1] consisting of about 2400 slaves,

  1. From a census taken in the year 1827 the population of Belize is as follows.
    Males. Females
    Whites 267, Whites 65
    Coloured 585, Coloured 452
    Free Negroes 1044, Free Negroes 374
    Slaves 1606, Slaves 804
    3502 1695
    Troops 456.