Page:Lake Ngami.djvu/484

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476
THE REED-FERRY—THE BAYEYE.

most daily presented itself to the view, which alone was a sufficient reward for my troubles and anxieties.

Lake Ngami-p476.png

REED-FERRY.[1]

 

 

CHAPTER XXXIX.

The Bayeye.—Their Country; Persons; Language; Disposition; Lying and Pilfering Habits.—Polygamy practiced among the Bayeye.—Their Houses; Dress; Ornaments; Weapons; Liquors; Agriculture; Grain; Fruits; Granaries.—Hunting.—Fishing.—Nets.—Diseases.—The Matsanyana.—The Bavicko.—Libèbé.

For a considerable distance to the northward of the chief's werft, the banks of the Teoge are inhabited by Bayeye, and a few scattered Bushmen, all acknowledging Lecholètébè as their chief. Cooley supposes that these people came originally from the West Coast, and that they have been established

  1. The above wood-cut represents a native in the act of ferrying himself across the river on nothing but a bundle of reeds, with sidings and uprights of the same light materials. It is a most ingenious contrivance, and, in localities where wood is scarce, answers the purpose admirably.