Page:Latin for beginners (1911).djvu/37

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17
FIRST PRINCIPLES

33. The following table shows a comparison between English and Latin declension forms, and should be thoroughly memorized:


English Cases Latin Cases
Declension of who? Name of case and use Declension of domina and translation Name of case and use Singular
  • Who?
  • Whose?
  • Whom?
  • Nominative — case of the subject
  • Possessive — case of the possessor
  • Objective — case of the object
  • do’min-a the lady
  • domin-ae the lady’s, of the lady
  • domin-am the lady
  • Nominative — case of the subject
  • Genitive — case of the possessor
  • Accusative — case of the direct object
  • Who?
  • Whose?
  • Whom?
  • Nominative — case of the subject
  • Possessive — case of the possessor
  • Objective — case of the object
  • domin-ae the ladies
  • domin-ā’rum the ladies’, of the ladies
  • domin-ās the ladies
  • Nominative — case of the subject
  • Genitive — case of the possessor
  • Accusative — case of the direct object

Plural

When the nominative singular of a noun ends in -a, observe that
a. The nominative plural ends in -ae.
b. The genitive singular ends in -ae and the genitive plural in -ārum.
c. The accusative singular ends in -am and the accusative plural in -ās.
d. The genitive singular and the nominative plural have the same ending.

34. EXERCISE Pronounce the following words and give their general meaning. Then give the number and case, and the use of each form. Where the same form stands for more than one case, give all the possible cases and uses.

1. Silva, silvās, silvam.
2. Fugam, fugae, fuga.
3. Terrārum, terrae, terrās.
4. Aquās, causam, lūnās.
5. Filiae, fortūnae, lūnae.
6. Iniūriās, agricolārum, aquārum.
7. Iniūriārum, agricolae, puellās
8. Nautam, agricolās, nautās.
9. Agricolam, puellam, silvārum.