Page:Latin for beginners (1911).djvu/45

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25
THE FIRST DECLENSION

LESSON VII

THE FIRST OR Ā-DECLENSION

57. In the preceding lessons we have now gone over all the cases, singular and plural, of nouns whose nominative singular ends in -a. All Latin nouns whose nominative singular ends in -a belong to the First Declension. It is also called the Ā-Declension because of the prominent part which the vowel a plays in the formation of the cases. We have also learned what relations are expressed by each case. These results are summarized in the following table:

Case Noun Translation Use and General Meaning of Each Case
Singular
  • Nom.
  • Gen.
  • Dat.
  • Acc.
  • Abl.
  • do’min-a
  • domin-ae
  • domin-ae
  • domin-am
  • domin-ā
  • the lady
  • of the lady, or the lady’s
  • to or for the lady
  • the lady
  • from, with, by, in, the lady
  • The subject
  • The possessor of something
  • Expressing the relation to or for, especially the *indirect object
  • The direct object
  • Separation (from), association or means (with, by), place where or time when (in, at)
Plural
  • Nom.
  • Gen.
  • Dat.
  • Acc.
  • Abl.
  • domin-ae
  • domin-ā’rum
  • domin-īs
  • domin-ās
  • domin-īs
  • the ladies
  • of the ladies, ox the ladies’
  • to or for the ladies
  • the ladies
  • from, with, by, in, the ladies

The same as the singular

58. The Base. That part of a word which remains unchanged in inflection and to which the terminations are added is called the base.

Thus, in the declension above, domin- is the base and -a is the termination of the nominative singular.