Page:Life among the Apaches.djvu/53

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CHAPTER V.


Mangas Colorado.—His Personal Appearance, Power, and Influence.—Indian Forces at the Copper Mines.—The Navajoes.—Their Appearance and Subsequent Acts.—Their Schemes Foiled.—Mangas in Full Uniform.—Strange Mode of Attire.—Inez Gonzales.—Her Rescue.—New Mexican Traders.—Summary Proceedings.—Story of Inez.—March into Sonora.—Santa Cruz.—Restoration of Inez.—Her subsequent History.—Tanori.


Mangas Colorado, or Red Sleeves, was, undoubtedly, the most prominent and influential Apache who has existed for a century. Gifted with a large and powerful frame, corded with iron-like sinews and muscles, and possessed of far more than an ordinary amount of brain strength, he succeeded, at an early age, in winning a reputation unequaled in his tribe. His daring exploits, his wonderful resources, his diplomatic abilities, and his wise teachings in council soon surrounded him with a large and influential band, which gave him a sort of prestige and sway among the various branches of his race, and carried his influence from the Colorado river to the Guadalupe mountains. Throughout Arizona and New Mexico, Mangas Colorado was a power in the land. Yet he could assume no authority not delegated to him by his people. He never presumed to speak for them as one having authority, but invariably said he would use his influence to perform certain promises and engagements. Mangas, in one of his raids into Sonora, carried off a handsome and intelligent Mexican girl, whom he made his wife, to the exclusion of his Apache squaws. This singular favoritism bred some trouble in the tribe