Page:Oliver Twist (1838) vol. 2.djvu/306

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286
Oliver Twist.

CHAPTER XXXVI.

In which the reader, if he or she resort to the Fifth Chapter of this Second Book will perceive a contrast not uncommon in matrimonial cases.

Mr. Bumble sat in the workhouse parlour, with his eyes moodily fixed on the cheerless grate, whence, as it was summer time, no brighter gleam proceeded than the reflection of certain sickly rays of the sun, which were sent back from its cold and shining surface. A paper fly-cage dangled from the ceiling, to which he occasionally raised his eyes in gloomy thought; and, as the heedless insects hovered round the gaudy network, Mr. Bumble would heave a deep sigh, while a more gloomy shadow over-spread his countenance. Mr. Bumble was meditating, and it might be that the insects