Page:Paper and Its Uses.djvu/142

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126
PAPER AND ITS USES


colour. These papers are used for manilla labels (parcel tags), cartons, folders in index systems, correspondence covers, index cards, and for work where strength and durability are essential. The term "manilla" is now applied to a class of paper rather than to the papers made entirely or principally of manilla fibre. Many such papers are composed of unbleached chemical wood pulp, a long-fibred tough paper resulting, which is suitable for most of the purposes for which manilla papers are generally employed. For envelopes, however, the genuine article is not easily replaced. Low grade manillas may contain mechanical wood. Usual size and weights: double crown, 80, 100, 120 Ib. per ream of 480 sheets.

Map Papers are thin and tough, folding without cracking, usually slightly sized with animal sizing. Used for printing maps which are to be folded into small compass.

Marbled Papers are used for covers of various books, as wholly covering the book, or as sides in half- and quarter-binding, but the principal use is for end papers in account books. High-class marbled papers are made a sheet at a time in the following manner: a trough of gum is prepared, the colours for the pattern are sprinkled and dropped upon the surface, patterns are made by combing or some other means of regularising the design. The body paper is let down carefully to the gum, the colour adheres to the paper, and the sheets are hung to dry. Intricate machines are employed to make marbled papers, depositing the colours for transference to the paper. There are many patterns of marbling, the favourites being the Spanish, shell, and nonpareil designs, carried out in reds, blues, and greens. Fancy marbled papers are sold, but binders are conservative in their tastes. Cheap marbled papers are produced by lithography.

Metallic Paper is a coated paper for special uses, such as note-books for indelible writing, in which case writing with a metal stylus or indelible pencil is easily made, but cannot be erased; for indicator diagrams for various instruments where a light touch only can be given, but