Page:Paradise lost by Milton, John.djvu/241

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235
BOOK VII.

Seemed liked to Heaven, a seat where Gods might dwell,
Or wander with delight, and love to haunt330
Her sacred shades: though God had yet not rained
Upon the earth, and man to till the ground
None was, but from the earth a dewy mist
Went up and watered all the ground, and each
Plant of the field, which ere it was in the earth
God made, and every herb, before it grew
On the green stem. God saw that it was good:
So even and morn recorded the third day.
"Again the Almighty spake:—'Let there be lights
High in the expanse of heaven, to divide340
The day from night; and let them be for signs,
For seasons, and for days, and circling years;
And let them be for lights, as I ordain
Their office in the firmament of heaven,
To give light on the earth!' and it was so.
And God made two great lights, great for their use
To Man, the greater to have rule by day,
The less by night, altern; and made the stars,
And set them in the firmament of heaven
To illuminate the earth, and rule the day350
In their vicissitude, and rule the night,
And light from darkness to divide. God saw,
Surveying his great work, that it was good.
For, of celestial bodies first, the Sun