Page:Paradise lost by Milton, John.djvu/269

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263
BOOK VIII.

Given and received; but in disparity,
The one intense, the other still remiss,
Cannot well suit with either, but soon prove
Tedious alike. Of fellowship I speak
Such as I seek, fit to participate390
All rational delight, wherein the brute
Cannot be human consort. They rejoice
Each with their kind, lion with lioness;
So fitly them in pair thou hast combined.
Much less can bird with beast, or fish with fowl
So well converse, nor with the ox the ape;
Worse then can man with beast, and least of all.'
"Whereto the Almighty answered, not displeased:
'A nice and subtle happiness, I see,
Thou to thyself proposest, in the choice400
Of thy associates, Adam, and wait taste
No pleasure, though in pleasure, solitary.
What thinkest thou then of me, and this my state?
Seem I to thee sufficiently possessed
Of happiness, or not? who am alone
From all eternity; for none I know
Second to me or like, equal much less,
How have I then with whom to hold converse?
Save with the creatures which I made, and those
To me inferior, infinite descents410
Beneath what other creatures are to thee.'
"He ceased; I lowly answered:—'To attain