Page:Paradise lost by Milton, John.djvu/391

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385
BOOK XI.

Fast caught, they liked and each his liking chose.
And now of love they treat, till the evening-star,
Love's harbinger, appeared; then all in heat
They light the nuptial torch, and bid invoke590
Hymen, then first to marriage rites invoked:
With feast and music all the tents rescund.
Such happy interview, and fair event
Of love and youth not lost, songs, garlands, flowers,
And charming symphonies, attached the heart
Of Adam, scon inclined to admit delight,
The bent of nature; which he thus expressed:
"True opener of mine eyes, prime Angel blest!
Much better seems this vision, and more hope
Of peaceful days portends, than those two past.600
Those were of hate and death, or pain much worse;
Here nature seems fulfilled in all her ends."
To whom thus Michael:—"Judge not what is best
By pleasure, though to nature seeming meet,
Created, as thou art, to nobler end,
Holy and pure, comformity divine.
Those tents thou sawest so pleasant were the tents
Of wickedness, wherein shall dwell his race