Page:Philosophy of bhagawad-gita.pdf/151

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127
FOURTH LECTURE

of having Hinduism, we have assimilated a whole collection of superstitious beliefs and practices which do not by any means tend to promote the welfare of the Hindu nation, but demoralise it and sap its spiritual strength, and have led to the present state of things, which, I believe, is not entirely due to political degeneration.

Our Society stands upon an altogether unsectarian basis; we sympathise with every religion, but not with every abuse that exists under the guise of religion; and while sympathising with every religion, and making the best efforts we can for the purpose of recovering the common foundations that underlie all religious beliefs, it ought to be the duty of every one of us to try to enlighten our own countrymen on the philosophy of religion, endeavour to lead them back to a purer faith--a faith which, no doubt, did exist in former times, but which now lives but in name or in the pages of forgotten books.







Printed by J. R. Aria at the Vasanta Press, Adyar, Madras.