Page:Pieces People Ask For.djvu/181

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68
THE READING-CLUB.

Like flowers in the night—reach me those violets—
It is a flame a single look will kindle,
But not an ocean quench.
Fostered by dreams, excited by each thought,-,
Love is a star from heaven, that points the way
And leads us to its home—a little spot
In earth's dry desert, where the soul may rest—
A grain of gold in the dull sand of life—
A foretaste of Elysium; but when
Weary of this world's woes, the immortal gods
Flew to the skies, with all their richest gifts,
Love staid behind, self-exiled for man's sake!
Ing. I never yet heard aught so beautiful!
But still I comprehend it not.
Par. Nor I.
For I have never felt it ; yet I know
A song my mother sang, an ancient song,
That plainly speaks of love, at least to me.
How goes it? Stay—

[Slowly, as trying to recollect.

"What love is, if thou wouldst he taught,
Thy heart must teach alone,—
Two souls with but a single thought,
Two hearts that beat as one.

And whence comes love? like morning's light,
It comes without thy call;
And how dies love?—A spirit bright,
Love never dies at all!"

And when—and when—

[Hesitating as if unable to continue.

Ing. Go on.
Par. I know no more.
Ing. (Impatiently.) Try—try!
Par. I cannot now; but at some other time
I may remember.
Ing. (Somewhat authoritatively.) Now, go on, I say.
Par. (Springing up in alarm.) Not now, I want more
roses for my wreath!
Yonder they grow, I will fetch them for myself.
Take care of all my flowers and the wreath!

[Throws the flowers into Ingomar's lap and runs off.