Page:Pirates of Penzance (Hitchcock publication).djvu/9

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THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE;

OR,

THE SLAVE OF DUTY.


Scene.A rocky sea-shore on the coast of Cornwall. Rocks L. sloping down to L. C. of stage. Under these rocks is a cavern, the entrance to which is seen at first entrance L. A natural arch of rock occupies the R. C. of the stage. In the distance is a calm sea, on which a schooner is lying at anchor.
As the curtain rises groups of Pirates are discovered, some drinking, some playing cards. Samuel, the Pirate Lieutenant, is going from one group to another, filling the cups from a flask. Frederic is seated in a despondent attitude at the back of the scene, C. Ruth kneels at his feet.

Opening Chorus.

Pour, oh pour the pirate sherry!
Fill, oh fill the pirate glass!
And, to make us more than merry,
Let the pirate bumper pass.

Solo.—Samuel.

For to-day our pirate 'prentice
Rises from indentures freed.
Strong his arm and keen his scent is;
He's a pirate now indeed!

All.

Here's good luck to Frederic's venture:
Frederic's out of his indentures!

Solo.—Samuel.

Two-and-twenty, now he's rising,
And alone he's fit to fly;
Which we're bent on signalizing
With unusual revelry.

All.

Here's good luck to Frederic's ventures;
Frederic's out of his indentures.
So pour, oh pour the pirate sherry, etc.