Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 21.djvu/143

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
This page has been validated.
135
LITERARY NOTICES.

Publications of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and of its Officers, Students, and Alumni. 1862-1881. Compiled by William Ripley Nichols, S. B. Boston: A. A. Kingman. Pp. 50.

The list is intended to include the books, pamphlets, reports, and contributions to periodicals (excepting daily journals) printed during the time included within its scope, by the Institute officials and its affiliated societies and associations; by professors and other instructors during their connection with the school; by special students during their connection with the school; and by alumni and holders of certificates of proficiency during their connection with the school and in after-life. The list is of considerable size, covers a variety of subjects, literary and scientific, includes many titles from foreign journals, and is creditable to the institution and to American research.

The Science of Mind. By John Bascom, author of "The Principles of Psychology," "Comparative Psychology," etc. G. P. Putnam's Sons. Pp. 462.Price, $2.

The first thing to be said about Dr. Bascom's various philosophical works is that the handling of the subjects is his own, and in stamping upon them the individuality of his own mind he gives them a new and attractive interest. And that freedom and freshness which he maintains in his methods of statement are to no small degree preserved in the elucidation of his views. He is in no sense either a compiler or a servile expositor of established opinions, but he is an independent (we had almost said a free) thinker upon his chosen themes of study. Although by no means always up to the times, he is always in a progressive way, and moves as fast, perhaps, as the circumstances will allow. His present work, "The Science of Mind," though avowedly and essentially metaphysical, and standing squarely upon intuitional or transcendental ground, is still a very different book from its predecessors of the same class, and shows that the intelligent metaphysician is compelled to yield to the advance of scientific knowledge.

Dr. Bascom does not sympathize with the current reproaches of metaphysical philosophy, but recognizes that, like all other imperfect and difficult things, it may be and must be practically improved. In his preface he says: "If asked why I hoped that this volume might reward study, I should answer, not because the system presented is new, but because the statement it here receives is at once succinct and elaborate, is strengthened by new points, by a consistent! maintenance of all that belongs to it, and by the rejection of that which, essentially alien to its principles, only embarrasses it. I trust the intuitive philosophy will be found hereby to have gained somewhat of that proof which springs from completeness and proportion of parts."

 

 

PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED.

Political Economy in One Lesson. By Alphonse Coartola. New York: The Society for Political Education. 1882. Pp. 20.

Formula and Tables for the Horse-Power of Leather Belts. By A. F. Nagle, M. E. Providence, Rhode Island: J. A. & R. A. Reid, printers. 1882. Pp. 8.

A Free Canal. Letter of ex-Governor Seymour. Pp. 5.

Some Points relating to the Geological Exploration of the Fortieth Parallel. By M. E. Wadsworth, Ph. D. Reprint from "Proceedings of the Boston Society of Natural History." Pp. 32.

History of the Water-Supply of the World. By Thomas J. Bell. Cincinnati, Ohio: Peter G. Thomson. 1882. Pp. 134.

The Geological and Natural History Survey of Minnesota. Ninth Annual Report. By N. H. Winchell, State Geologist. St. Peter: J. K. More, State Printer. 1881. Pp. 392.

The Constants of Nature. Part V. A Recalculation of the Atomic Weights. By Professor F. W. Clarke. S. B. Washington: Smithsonian Institution. 1882. Pp. 271.

Natural Law. or the Science of Justice. Part I. By Lysander Spooner. Boston: A. Williams & Co*. 1882. Pp 16.

Our Homes. By Henry Hartshorne. Philadelphia: P. Blakiston, Son & Co. 1882. Pp. 119. 50 cents.

Report to the State Board of Health on the Methods of Sewerage for Cities and Large Village* in the State of New York. By James F. Gardiner, Director of the New York State Survey. Pp. 15.

Nervous Shock as a Therapeutical Agent. By Romaine J. Curtis. M. D. "St. Louis Medical Journal "Publishing Co. 1882. Pp. 13.

The Germination and Vitality of Seeds. By Richard E. Kanze, M. D. Pp. 14. 50 cents.

National Regulation of Interstate Commerce. By C. C. Bonney. Chicago: Legal News Co. 1882. Pp. 32.

A Free Canal. Argument of the New York Produce Exchange in favor of making the Canals of the State free from Tolls. 1882. Pp. 18.

The Books of Chilan Balam: The Prophetic and Historic Records of the Mayas of Yucatan. By Daniel G. Brinton. M. D. Philadelphia: Edward Stern & Co. 1882. Pp. 19.