Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 37.djvu/741

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THE

POPULAR SCIENCE

MONTHLY.

 

OCTOBER, 1890.


 

NEW CHAPTERS IN THE WARFARE OF SCIENCE.

X. THE FALL OF MAN AND ANTHROPOLOGY.

By ANDREW DICKSON WHITE, LL.D., L.H.D.,

EX-PRESIDENT OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY.

PART II.

WE have seen that, closely connected with the main lines of investigation in Archæology and Anthropology, there were other researches throwing much light on the entire subject. In a previous chapter we saw especially how Lafitau and Jussieu were among the first to collect and compare facts bearing on the natural history of man, gathered by travelers in various parts of the earth, thus laying foundations for the science of Comparative Ethnology. It was soon seen that Ethnology had most important bearings upon the question of the material, intellectual, moral, and religious evolution of the human race; in every civilized nation, therefore, appeared eminent men who began to study the characteristics of various groups of men as ascertained from travelers, and to compare the results thus gained with each other and with those obtained by Archæology.

Thus, more and more clear became the evidences that the tendency of the race has been upward from low beginnings. It was found that groups of men still existed possessing characteristics of those in the early periods of development to whom the drift and caves and shell-heaps and pile-dwellings bear witness; groups of men using many of the same implements and weapons, building their houses in the same way, seeking their food by the same means, enjoying the same amusements, going through the same general stages of culture; some being in a condition corresponding to the earlier, some to the later periods.

From all sides thus came evidence that we have still upon