Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 41.djvu/305

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291
ANTHROPOLOGICAL WORK IN AMERICA.

"A course of special training in archæology and ethnology, requiring three years for its completion, will be given by Prof. Putnam. It will be carried on by work in the laboratory and museum, lectures, field-work, and exploration, and in the third year by some special research. The ability to use French and Spanish will be necessary. For this course a knowledge of elementary chemistry, geology, botany, zoölogy, drawing, and surveying is required, and courses in ancient history, ancient arts, and classical archæology are recommended as useful." Students are now pursuing such study at Harvard under Prof. Putnam's direction. Since the establishment of this department a fellowship at Harvard University has been founded by Mrs. Mary C. Thaw, of Pittsburgh. Founded largely from personal admiration of Miss Alice C. Fletcher, and appreciation of her work, the fellowship is to be held by this lady during her life. In the event of Miss PSM V41 D305 F W Putnam.jpgProf. F. W. Putnam. Fletcher's death, "the income from the fund of thirty thousand dollars is to be paid as a salary to such person as shall be appointed by the trustees of the museum to carry on the same line of work and research relating to the Indian race of America, or other ethnological and archæological investigations." At the University of Pennsylvania a special chair of American Archaeology and Linguistics is held by Dr. D. G. Brinton, than whom no man in America is better qualified to offer courses in Indian languages. The broadest anthropological work at present offered in an American institution is that conducted by Dr. Franz Boas at Clark University, Worcester, Mass. Dr. Boas received his training in anthropological study in Germany. Although partial to work in the direction of comparative mythology and linguistics, he is thoroughly trained in the methods of ethnography and physical anthropology. A great traveler and an excellent field-student, he has done admirable work among the Eskimos and the tribes of the northwest coast of America. For several years he has directed an exploration among these people, supported by a fund