Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 65.djvu/345

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341
ITALIAN AND OTHER LATIN IMMIGRANTS.

ITALIAN AND OTHER LATIN IMMIGRANTS.
By Dr. ALLAN MCLAUGHLIN,

U. S. PUBLIC HEALTH AND MARINE HOSPITAL SERVICE.

ITALIAN immigration was insignificant until 1880. In that year we received about 12,000 Italian immigrants, and since that time the number increased steadily until the year 1891, when 76,000 arrived in the United States. This number was not exceeded until 1899, when the total yearly Italian arrivals began again to increase and in the past year (1903) leached the astounding total of 233,546. Eighty-five per cent, of this total was made up of southern Italians. The following tables indicate the distribution of Italians landed in the United States in 1903:

North Italians.

State. Number of North Italians. Ratio to Total North Italians Landed.
New York 9,452 25 per cent
Pennsylvania 7,641 20 "
California 5,369 14 "
Illinois 3,163 8 "
Massachusetts 2,233 6 "
Connecticut 1,242 3 .5 "
Michigan 1,209 3 .5 "
New Jersey 1,158 3 "
All other states 6,142 17 "
Total 37,429 100 per cent
 

South Italians.

State. Number of South Italians. Ratio to Total South Italians Landed.
New York 91,774 47 per cent
Pennsylvania 42,096 22 "
Massachusetts 13,731 7 "
New Jersey 9,970 5 "
Illinois 6,637 3 "
Connecticut 6,301 3 "
Ohio 5,372 3 "
Louisiana 4,815 2 "
Rhode Island 3,515 2 "
West Virginia 2,096 1 "
All other states 9,210 5 "
Total 196,117 100 per cent

In considering Italian immigrants it is necessary to recognize the differences existing between northern and southern Italians. The northern Italian is taller, often of lighter complexion, and is usually in a more prosperous condition than his brother from the south. The northern Italian is intelligent, can nearly always read and write, and very often is skilled in some trade or occupation. He compares favorably with the Scandinavian or German, and his desirability as an im-