Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 69.djvu/385

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.
381
THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE

THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE

THE BRITISH MEDICAL ASSOCIATION AND THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

The British Medical Association held its seventy-fourth meeting at Toronto, beginning on August 21. There were in attendance about 1,400 British and Canadian members of the association and about GOO visitors and guests from the United States. In addition to some 300 members from the British islands*, there were delegates from India, South Africa and other widely separated parts of the British Empire, and several scientific men from the European continent. The meeting had thus many of the advantages of an international gathering, without the polyglot confusion. Dr. R. A. Reeve, dean of the Medical Faculty of the University of Toronto, made the presidential address, and there were addresses in medicine, by Sir James Barr; in surgery, by Sir Victor Horsley. and in obstetrics, by Dr. W. S. A. Griffeth. The sections covered dermatology, laryngology and otology, medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, ophthalmology, pediatrics, pathology and bacteriology, physiology, psychology state medicine, surgery and therapeutics. As usual in British scientific meetings, the social features were prominent, and the excursions numerous and well arranged.

Not the least interesting part of the meeting was the opportunity of visiting Toronto and its great university. The movement which ended in the establishment of the University of Toronto was initiated in the eighteenth century, but the institution, which was originally called King's College, was not opened until 1843. Numerous

PSM V69 D385 University of toronto medical building 1906.pngThe New Medical Building.