Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 74.djvu/413

From Wikisource
Jump to navigation Jump to search
This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.
409
THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE

MANUSCRIPT OF DARWIN'S "DESCENT OF MAN"

fear & something very like modesty, when begging too often for food. Some dogs and other animals as horses easily turn sulky; some are good-tempered, others ill-tempered. A great dog scorns the snarling of a little dog. Several observers have stated that monkeys certainly hate being laughed at. They will also make for themselves imaginary offenses; thus I saw a baboon in the Zoological Gardens who always got into a furious passion, when his keeper took out a letter or book and read it aloud to him; on one occasion in his rage he bit his own leg till the blood flowed.

We will now turn to the more intellectual emotions & faculties, which are very important as the almost necessary steps to the development of the higher mental powers. Animals manifestly enjoy excitement, & suffer from ennui, as may be seen with dogs & according to Rengger with monkeys. All animals plainly feel Wonder; & may exhibit Curiosity, as is sometimes proved to their cost by the hunter playing antics and thus attracting them.

There can, I think, be no doubt that a dog feels shame, as distinct from fear, and something very like modesty when begging too often for food. A great dog scorns the snarling of a little dog, and this may be called magnanimity. Several observers have stated that monkeys certainly dislike being laughed at; and they sometimes invent imaginary offences. In the Zoological Gardens I saw a baboon who always got into a furious rage when his keeper took out a letter or book and read it aloud to him; and his rage was so violent that, as I witnessed on one occasion, he bit his own leg till the blood flowed.

We will now turn to the more intellectual emotions and faculties, which are very important, as forming the basis for the development of the higher mental powers. Animals manifestly enjoy excitement and suffer from ennui, as may be seen with dogs, and, according to Rengger, with monkeys. All animals feel Wonder, and may exhibit Curiosity. They sometimes suffer from this latter quality, as when the hunter plays antics and thus attracts them;