Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 75.djvu/317

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THE

POPULAR SCIENCE

MONTHLY

 

OCTOBER, 1909




THE HUDSON-FULTON CELEBRATION OF 1909
By Dr. GEORGE FREDERICK KUNZ

NEW YORK CITY

SINCE the London Exhibition of 1851, and the first Paris Exposition of 1855, there have been probably one hundred expositions in various parts of the world. Generally they have been held in commemoration of some historic event or anniversary, and each one, large or small, has usually had some special distinctive feature. The great exposition at Chicago had its White City and its illuminations; the Buffalo Exposition had its architecture, its illuminations and the added advantage of its striking environment, and the various French expositions have each possessed peculiar points to mark their individuality. All of them have been held for six months or more, but in a great many cases from one third to one half of that time elapsed before all the departments were completed and opened to the public. In this way public interest was checked at the beginning, and when the exposition was finally completed, a good part of the allotted time had passed, and the enthusiasm always excited by these affairs had begun to flag.

New York in itself is not only the greatest exposition, perhaps, in the world, because of its geographic features and its wonderful resources, but its various lines of transit—surface cars, elevated railways and subways—facilitate the handling of great crowds. In addition to this New York lies between two rivers, and is as easily reached by boat as by rail, to say nothing of the attractive physical advantages this location gives it.

The writer, in an article published in the North American Review for September, 1902, and entitled "The Management and Uses of Expositions," strongly urged the holding of an exposition to mark the tercentenary of Henry Hudson's arrival at the mouth of the river which bears his name. The forecast of the present advantages of our city