Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 77.djvu/315

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THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE

309

THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE

THE SCIENTIFIC LABORATORIES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

The colleges first established in this country prior to the revolution, apart from the two in Virginia, have all become great universities within the past forty years. Harvard, Yale, Columbia and Pennsylvania have preceded Princeton in this development, and for a period it was doubtful whether Princeton should be ranked among the universities or among the colleges. When, on the occasion of its sesquicentennial celebration in 1896, the official name of the College of New Jersey was changed to Princeton University, it was not so much a measure of what had been accomplished as a promise of things hoped for but unseen. The prophecy is now, however, in course of fulfilment. Princeton, it is true, has no professional schools, except its departments of civil and electrical engineering. A law school was once established, but it lasted only two years. No school of medicine is in contemplation, though the first two years of a medical course could be given to advantage. The theological seminary in the village has supplied a large proportion of the students registered in the graduate department, but it has no official connection with the university and is too narrowly denominational to be regarded as a graduate school of theology.

In most of our universities, however, the professional schools scarcely form an integral part of the institution and the graduate school is the place in which university and research work is accomplished. Such work has been

PSM V77 D315 Holder hall dormitory erected by mrs sage.png

Holler Hall, a dormitory erected by Mrs. Sage.