Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 90.djvu/372

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356

��Popular Science Monthly

��BODY SIDE STAKES

��BODY TRANSVERoE THREL- SPEED FOOT BRAKE ON

SUPPORTS PROGRESSIVE GEARSET DRIVINO SHAFT

��CHANGE -GEAR LEVER

SOLINE^

��. FRAME.

REAR

SPRING

VvORM GEAR

WORPFWHEe.,

CASING

���WORM WHEEL

��RADIUS ROD TORQUE ARM / ROD tEAR AXLE FRONT SUPPORT

RADIUS ROD & TORQUE ARM

��% CLUTCH PLDAL AND BRAKL LEVER i

��STEER! NG- KNUCKLE

��If you took a huge knife capable of cutting hardened and heat-treated steel and slashed it down through the center of a modern motor-truck from one end to the other, the result would be something like this picture, in which all the vital parts of the vehicle are exposed to view. Note how compactly the internal parts are arranged despite the long wheelbase of the vehicle, and how few rods are exposed to the wear and tear of travel. Another significant feature revealed

��A Pushmobile De Luxe for the Youthful Speedster

A THREE-WHEELED vehicle built for boys and girls from eight to fifteen years of age is the latest addition to the pushmobile family. It is operated by hand by means of a forward and backward lever and rack movement. As shown in the accompanying illustration, it is made of bicycle parts and is steered with the feet. The front and rear wheels are placed far apart to prevent overturning. It is equipped with a bucket seat of the rac- ing car type, and other up- to-date para- phernalia.

���The latest thing in pushmobiles. It is operated by means of a lever and rack movement and is equipped with all the pushmo- bile refinements including a hand-horn and an electric searchlight

��Where Is the Automobile Seemingly Most Popular?

TWENTY years ago the horseless car- riage was in its earliest experimental stages. To-day there are more than two- and a half million motor cars in the United States — a car to every forty-one persons! In sixteen years the revenue derived from automobile licenses alone has grown from less than a thousand dollars to more than eighteen millions in the year 1916. Ninety per cent of this amount was spent on road and highway improvements. But perhaps the most interesting facts in the automo- bile industry relate to the car-per-pop- ulation figures. Iowa, for instance, has a car to every fifteen persons, while New York, our richest State, has a car to every thirty- nine persons. In other words, Iowa, in proportion to her population, has twice as many cars as New York, and twenty times as many as Tennessee.

The Southern States have the lowest averages of automo- biles a c c o rd i n g to population, while the Western States have the largest.

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