Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 90.djvu/50

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��Popular Science Monthly

���Mental Tjrpe. Quiet and reserved; tolerant; not ex- citable; close thinker; set, determined views; makes up his mind and draws his own conclusions; more ret- rospective than observant; slow and deliberate; syste- matic and self-centered

��Mental-motive Type. Strong in self-esteem ; ener- getic; positive and deter- mined; observant; convinc- ing; conservative; good talker; sure of himself and filled with importance of his own work; clear thinker; practical and very energetic

��Motive-mental Type. Plausible ; agreeable and friendly; anxious to please; energetic and practical; sys- tematic; open-minded; pro- gressive; active and alert; observant; an accomplisher; clear headed; good at out- door work; great endurance

��pedigree is unknown. Principles of effi- ciency were applied to the evolution and development of racers long before they were applied to shopwork.

Horses are not all good as the rose family is, nor all bad as the cimex is. Each horse has in him a great multitude of special characteristics, and, what is quite as important, a lack of other strains, so we can at any time start with a horse in which there is a preponderance of desirable traits and of desirable negatives.

Picking the Right Man Out of 1,600,000,000

Similarly, in selecting a human being for a position, our aim should be to find as nearly as we can in all the world the man or woman best suited for the position. Not only should the position be well filled, but each worker should be in the highest posi- tion he is capable of filling. A Caruso, a Paderewski, a Kreisler, ought not to beg for pennies from door to door.

In my own association of forty men I aim to apply the methods and tests that I recommend to all. I begin at the beginning. When any new work is to be undertaken the first question is this: Should it be done by a machine, an uncarnate thing, or by an incarnate being? It may be far better to assign the work to a windmill, or to a water-

��wheel, or to some other power engine, than to a man. If, however, we need co-operat-

���Coimt Zeppelin. Obviously scientific; an investigator; goes into matters with great exactness; has a good mathematical head; works matters out well ; great perseverance, resourcefulness; new ideas that are well sys- tematized and worked out. A strong character

ing, incarnate skill and intelligence, can the work be better done by human or by some other form of life?

If I want to move four hundred pounds

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