Page:Samuel Johnson (1911).djvu/163

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the mind, and life passes in dreams of rapture or of anguish."

��" PRAISE," said the sage, with a sigh, " is to an old man an empty sound. I have neither mother to be delighted with the reputation of her son, nor wife to partake the honours of her husband. 1 have outlived my friends and my rivals. Nothing is now of much import- ance; for I cannot extend my interest beyond myself. Youth is delighted with applause, be- cause it is considered as the earnest of some future good, and because the prospect of life is far extended: but to me, who am now de- clining to decrepitude, there is little to be feared from the malevolence of men, and yet less to be hoped from their affection or es- teem. Something they may yet take away, but they can give me nothing. Riches would now be useless, and high employment would be pain. My retrospect of life recalls to my view many opportunities of good neglected, much time squandered upon trifles, and more lost in idleness and vacancy. I leave many great designs unattempted, and many great attempts unfinished. My mind is burdened with no heavy crime, and therefore I compose myself to tranquillity; endeavour to abstract

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