Page:Southern Historical Society Papers volume 19.djvu/170

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164 Southern Historical Society Papers.

tion," and who humbly laid at the foot of the cross all of his ambi- tions and honors.

Having lived such a life the logical result was the glorious death which has been so fully described by Dr. Dabney, Dr. Hunter Mc- Guire and others.

HIS GLORIOUS DEATH.

Stonewall Jackson died as he lived an humble, trusting Chris- tian. Nay ! he did not die. The weary, worn marcher simply " crossed over the river and rested under the shade of the trees." The battle-scarred warrior fought his last battle, won his last victory, and went to wear his " bright crown of rejoicing," his fadeless laurels of honor, to receive from earth and from Heaven the plaudit :

Servant of God well done,

Rest from Thy loved employ ; The battle's fought, the victory's won ;

Enter thy Master's joy."

As veterans of the old Stonewall corps gather in Lexington around the grand monument of their old chief, and as comrades scattered all over the land shall read the story of the happy day, God grant that one and all of them may hear the voice of the glori- ous and glorified leader calling to them in trumpet tones : " BE YE

FOLLOWERS OF ME, EVEN AS I ALSO AM OF CHRIST !"

J. WILLIAM JONES. Atlanta, Ga.,]uly 16, 1891.

[From the Richmond Dispatch, July 29, 1891.]

THE SOUBRIQUET "STONEWALL." HOW IT WAS ACQUIRED.

A few more years will forever seal the lips of all who can speak from personal knowledge of the incidents of the "War Between the States." Any of them, therefore, who can now contribute to the perfect accuracy of history may be pardoned for doing so, even at the risk of incurring the charge of egotism. This is my only motive for troubling you with this brief article. I am one of those who heard General Barnard E. Bee utter the words which gave Jackson the name of "Stonewall."