Page:Southern Historical Society Papers volume 19.djvu/91

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History of the First Battle of Manassas, &c. 85

that he was and had been a " Nullifier" (whatever that was). An original "Secessionist;" had a brother fighting in Italy with Gara- baldi, whom he announced was expected daily the looked-for "Mili- tary Messiah;" and finally that he was a South Carolinian and came here to assist in fighting Virginia's battles. Then there were groans and derision from the assembled Virginians.

For a week ending July 2d, we were encamped near Martinsburg, some four miles from the ford of the Potomac leading to Hagers- town, called Falling Waters, watching the Federal army under Generel Patterson. At sunrise the alarm was given: " the enemy are crossing ! " and we were under arms on our way to the ford. Emerg- ing on the turnpike, we were halted to support a battery; skirmishers were thrown out, and soon we were all engaged. We tried hard to hold Patterson until General Johnston could come up from Winchester* but were forced back, and here we saw Colonel Jackson under fire for the first time; stolid, imperturbable, undisturbed, as he was watched by every eye; and his example was quieting and of decided moral effect. There, for the first time, we saw the long line of blue, with the United States flag in the center, and both sides exchanged shots; the first of the many fights in the old Valley of Virginia. We fell back through Martinsburg; it was occupied by General Patterson; and at a small hamlet called " Bunker Hill," some seven miles away, we, during the whole of July 4th, were in line of battle, expecting Patter- son hourly. The next evening we fell back upon Winchester, and after our arrival there happened an episode which I will relate briefly, as it was the first and only attempt at a mutiny ever heard of in the Confederate army.

About 3 o'clock on the afternoon of July lyth the long roll was beaten and we were marched to an adjoining field, crushing under our feet as we moved along the stone fences bounding it. There we found our five regiments surrounding a number of tents, and when the hollow square was perfect we became aware that we enclosed a a battalion of troops who had refused positively to further obey their commander. General Joe Johnston's adjutant, Colonel Whiting, with Colonel Jackson and the colonel of the refractory troops, rode up into the square. The drums were ordered to beat the assembly, and, to our infinite relief, the battalion, under the command of its several captains, fell into line at once. Then there was a dead silence. This was a mutiny! What came next? How was it to be punished? Was every tenth man to be shot, or only the officers ? As I rode along I heard these questions asked by both rank and file. Colo-