Page:Statesman's Year-Book 1899 American Edition.djvu/1237

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MOVEMENT OF THE POPULATION — RELIGION

881

lation has increased at the expense of the rural ; in tlie islands the reverse has been the case.

The chief towns with their population in 1890 were : Lisbon, 301,206 ; Oporto, 138,860 ; Braga, 23,089 ; Funchal (Madeira), 18,778 ; Setubal, 17,581 ; Covilha, 17,562 ; Coimbra, 16,985 ; Ponta Delgada (Azores), 16,767 ; Evora, 15,134 ; Povoa de Varzim, 12,057 ; Tavira, 11,558; Angra (Azores), 11,067; Ovar, 11,002.

Movement of the Population.

In 1896 there were 33,018 marriages, including 2,433 in the Azores and Madeira. The average for 1896 was 6*54 marriages per 1,000 of population.

The numbers of births and deaths in Continental Portugal and the Azores and Madeira for two years have been as follows : —

Births

Deaths

Legiti- mate

Illegiti- mate

Total Total 1895 1896

1805

1896

Continent Islands

Totals .

124,333 12,605

18,822 645

143,155 13,250

144,530 13,335

99,904 8,531

110,970 8,761

J36,938

19,467

156,405 157,865

108,435

119,731

The birth rate in 1896 was 31*24 per 1,000; the death rate 23-71 per 1,000. The rate of natural increase was 7 '53 per 1,000. In earlier years the births were: 1891, 162.051 ; 1892, 159,205 ; 1893, 164,141; 1894, 153 971 Deaths: 1891, 115,610 ; 1892, 103,587; 1893, 109,931 ; 1894, 107,450.

The number of emigrants from Portugal from 1866 to 1890 was 359,517. From 1878 to 1890 it was 275,442. For the last six years the emigration has been as follows : —

Years

Europe

Asia

Africa

America

Oceania

Total

Brazil ' .Oth,«^ Countries

1891 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896

351 302 290 252 327 355

7

10

6

2 3

1,574 1.189 1,252 1,402 1,239 1,145

29,630 ' 2,024 17,321 2,252 25,130 2,659 25,074 1,618 40,676 1.885 24,212 2,249

5

6

15

C17

16

33,585 21,074 30,383 29,261 44,746 27,080

Religion.

The Roman Catholic faith is the State religion ; but all other forms of worship are tolerated. Portugal, including the Azores and Madeira, is divided into three ecclesiastical provinces, with their seats at Lisbon, I3rar'a and Evora ; the lirst is under the jurisdiction of a Patriarcli, the otheis of Archbishops. The Patriarcli of Lisbon, if not a Cardinal at the time of liis nomination, receives that dignity as .soon as a i)lace lieconies vacant in the Holy College. Tiie Archltishop of Braga bears the title of Primate. The ecclesiastical provinces are divided into 14 dioceses. The Portuguese colonial

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