Page:Statesman's Year-Book 1899 American Edition.djvu/1272

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916

RUSSIA

Towns Population

Russia in Europe — Lubliu (P.) . 50,152 Ufa . . 49,961

Kaluga . . 49,728 Simi^heropol . 48,821 Tambov . . 48,134 Smolensk . 46,899

Grodno . . 46,871 Brest-Litovsk . 46,542 Perm . . 45,403 Czenstochowo (P.)45,130 Ryazan . . 44,552 Simbirsk . . 43,298 Moghilev on Dnie- per Dorpat (Yuricv) Kostroma

Kozlov Yelets Gomel Bobruisk . Mitau Kamenets- Podolsk Syzran Nyezliin .

1 With suLurbs.

43,106 42,421 41,268 40,347 37,455 36,846 35,177 35,011

34,483 32,377 32,108

Towns Mariupol . Izmail

Piotrkow (P. ) . Kerch -Yenikale Pskov Cherkassy

Population

. 31,772

. 31,293

. 30,824

30,342

30,424

29,619

Finland (1896)— Helsingfors . 77,414 Abo . . 34,964

Tammerfors . 26,713 Viborg . . 23,472

Russia in Asia — Tiflis(C.). . 160,645 Tashkend(T.) . 156,414 Baku(C.). . 112,253 Kokand (T.) . 82,054 Ekaterinodar (C. ) 65, 697 Namangan (T.) 61,906 Ekaterinburg (S.) 55,488 Samarcand(T.) 54,900 Tomsk (S.) . 52,430 Irkutsk (S.) . 51,434 Andiian(T.) . 46,680 Vladikavkaz (C.) 43,843

- 149,201 with Nakhichevan.

Towns Population

Stavropol (C.) . 41,621 Omsk(S.) . 37,470 Uralsk (St.) . 36,597 Old Marghelan

(T.) . . 36,592 Osh(T.) . . 36,474 Yeisk . . 35,446 Maikop (C) . 34,191 Elisabethpol (C.) 33,090 Kutais (C.) . 32,492 Alexandropol (C.) 32,018 Khojent(T.) . 30,076 Tyumen (S.) . 29,588 Barnaul (S.) 29,408

Nakhichevan (C.) 29,312 Erivan (C) . 29,033 Vladivostok (S.) 28,896 Batnm (C.) . 28,512 Krasnoyarsk (S.) 26,600 Semipalatinsk(St. )26,353 Shusha (C.) . 25,656 Nukha . . 24,811 Vyernyi(T.) . 22,982 Kars(C.). . 20,891 Tobolsk (S.) . 20,427

3 53)037 with sulnab.s.

Religion.

The established religion of the Emjjire is the Grfeco-Russian, oflficially called the Orthodox-Catholic Faith. It has its own independent synod, but maintains the relations of a sister Clnirch with the four patriarchates of Constantinople, Jerusalem, Antioch, and Alexandria, The Holy Synod, the board of government of the Church, was established with the concurrence of the Russian clergy and the four Eastern patriarchs.

The emperor is head of the Church; he appoints to every office in the Church, and is restricted only so far as to leave to the bishops and prelates the l)rivilege of proposing candidates; and he transfers and dismisses persons from their offices in certain cases. But he has never claimed the right of deciding theological and dogmatic questions. Practically, the Procurator of the Holy Synod enjoys wide powers in Church matters.

The points in which the Grteco-Russian Church difTers from the Roman Catholic faith arc, its denying the spiritual supremacy of the Pope, its not enforcing the celibacy of the clergy, and its authorising all individuals to read and study the Scriptures in the vernacular tongue. With the exception of the restraints laid on the Jews, all religions may be freely professed in the Empire. The dissenters have been and are still, however, severely perse- tuted, though recently some liberty has been extended to those of the ' United Church.' It is estimated that there are more tban 12,000,000 dissenters in Great Russia aloue. The allairs of the Ronian Catholic Cliurch