Page:Statesman's Year-Book 1899 American Edition.djvu/748

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302

HUNGARY

Tlie following table gives the division of the civil population according to eligion on the basis of the census of 1890: —

1

Religion

XuniLer

per cent, of pop.

Roman Catholics .... Greek Catholics .... Greek Oriental ..... Evangelical Augs. .... , Evangelical Helv

8,820,770 1,670,682 2,632,332 1,204,040 2,225,126

50-85

9-64 1 15-17 i

6-94 12-82

1 Unitarians .....

61,645

0-35 1

Jews ......

Others

Total . . . .;

1

725,222 9,581

4-18 0-05

17,349,398

100-00

Instruction.

Public education in Hungary comjaises the following grades: — (1) Infant schools; (2) elementary schools; (3) middle or secondary schools, gymnasia and realschools (in Croatia and Slavonia, realgymnasia); (4) pre- ])aratory and training institutions for infant-school nurses and male and female reachers; (5) academies (high schools) of law; (6) institutions for religious education; (7) universities; (8) polytechnicum (technical high school). The schools for special subjects, such as agi'icultural, industrial, commercial, mining, and military schools, are for the greater part administered by the competent ministries, while the philanthro])ic and artistic schools are placed under the authority of the Ministry of Puldic Instruction.

The progi'ess of elementary education in Hungary between the census of 1869 and that of 1880 and 1890 is shown in the following statement: —

Population

1809

1880

1890

Read and write

Read only ....

Neither read nor write .

Total .

3,990,519

1,344,292

10,082,516

5,389,190

911,557

9,341,355

7,326,372

557,854

9,465,172

15,117,327

15,642,102

17,349,398

Compulsory school attendance was established by law in 1868, for children of six to twelve years, and repetition courses for children of twelve to fifteen years; the industrial law of 1872 re(|uires special courses for apprentices; and by the law of 1891, children from three to six years of age may be sent to infant schools, unless otherwise ])rovided for.

Every parish or commune is bound to maintain an infant school.

Primary education is of three grades: — (1) Elementary schools connected with a repetition school; (2) high primary schools for boys and girls separately,